Really Really Free Market

6 May
Believe it or not, the Really Really Free Market is about a whole lot more than stuff. Sure, one of the most tangible results every month is the exchange of clothes, books, shoes, cds, movies, food, appliances and more. But those are not the only important results. The model of the Really Really Free Market is such that the more important results are not nearly as tangible.
We often say that the Really Really Free Market is about community. And it is. It is a community event. But it is also an anarchist event. The Really Really Free Market model views community as an alternative to the capitalist market. The Really Really Free Market is actively providing alternatives to the capitalist market. Instead of everyone having to struggle and scrounge to get the money necessary to buy things in the capitalist market, the Really Really Free Market gives us a place to share our resources and help each other out.
One of the results of the capitalist system is the emphasis on hierarchy. Hierarchy gets in the way of community. A hierarchical structure says that some people are more important than others, and that some people are less accountable than others. To build a more socially just community, power and accountability have to be shared. The Really Really Free Market is not about hierarchy.
No one is in charge of the Really Really Free Market. No one runs the Really Really Free Market. This means that anyone can decide to become involved. This can mean anything from making fliers, writing about it, posting up fliers, collecting donations, planning to play music, bringing things to share, making pinatas, cooking food, facilitating workshops, etc. And probably other ideas we haven’t come up with.

The Really Really Free Market can be a good venue in which to meet people, talk about capitalism, discuss how capitalism hurts our communities and environment, figure out other things we can do to resist capitalism in our daily lives.

The Really Really Free Market- not just a place to get free stuff.

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