Tag Archives: anarchists

RPD Backs Down from Legal Harassment, Anarchy Continues

11 Jan

The Richmond Police Department apparently told a reporter last night that they were dismissing their case against us in court. We have not yet received any official word regarding this- no papers or call or anything. (You never call, you never write). But if this is true it just means that the RPD and the City Attorney realized the HUGE publicity blunder they made in attempting to harass us via court complaints and emergencies orders over FOIA documents.

This does not mean they won’t try and file some other legal documents against us. And it doesn’t mean that the harassment is over. It only means that these particular documents that they filed might be retracted. Without an official apology or statement in regards to it being fucked up to harass us for being anarchists, and also illegal for them to ask for FOIA documents back, this does not mean much.

I appreciate the support legally and media wise from the ACLU.

I appreciate the media attention and coverage of anarchists that this whole tactical error on the part of the RPD and the City Attorney has given us. I also appreciate their direct involvement of my political beliefs in this case. They have made it exceedingly clear that we are enemies. The State and the police feel threatened by anarchists because we stand vehemently against their hierarchies and positions of power. I am anti-authoritarian. I am anti-hierarchy. I want the state and police to be destroyed. I don’t want reform, and I don’t think you can legislate or vote in real change. We need a revolution of the people. And it needs to start in all of our daily lives and communities. If we change our day to day, if we build our own alternatives to the state while resisting oppression, we might see a better world in our lifetimes.

The current system of capitalism and hierarchy CLEARLY does not work. Not for the jobless, the homeless, the hungry, the people without access to good education or healthcare. Not for the environment, future generations, animals, or indigenous people. We need to start trying new things. They won’t all work. But we will never progress into something better if we don’t start trying to find better ways of existing together.

 

 

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Richmond Tent City

23 Nov

This is a section in my upcoming book, The South is Still Rising. If it doesn’t totally make sense out of context it is because they are parter of a much larger piece about activism and anarchism in Richmond.

But I figured, given the current situation in Monroe Park, and the campaign to keep it open throughout renovations, it might be good to get the information out, and show people that the park has been occupied before.

Tent City

One of the bigger events organized by the General Strike Collective was a Tent City in Monroe Park in 1998. “It was in the late spring of ‘98 that the collective decided unanimously to propagandize and organize a four day takeover of Monroe Park in the form of a tent city aimed at exposing VCU’s ongoing meddling in the homeless community and rapidly increasing gentrification of the Carver Community just North of the main artery of the campus” (Wells 89). Tactics the group used in organizing involved planning sessions, alliance building, fliering campaigns, and street work.  The entire summer gave the group time to organize and strategize.
The event was scheduled to start Friday August 28 at noon, and continue through until Monday morning, August 31 (DOC T). This event was radical, noteworthy, and combines many of the subjects which activists in Richmond have organized around. It shows the potential scope of radical activism in Richmond, and it also shows some of the potential pitfalls of such activism.
A Tent City is “where any large group of individuals gather in a single location and utilize it as a temporary living quarter in protest of an oppressive entity”(DOC T). Described by General Strike, the Tent City in this instance was “a non-violent, direct action approach to exposing injustice in this society” (General Strike Oct./Nov. 1998). Tent cities have occurred around the world. They are in some ways associated with the homeless in general. Some of them are more political in purpose, where as others are more survival based- people form tent cities because they have no where else to go. The Tent City in Richmond was of the more political variety, and less about providing a place for people to live for any significant amount of time.
General Strike advertised about the Tent City in a couple of ways. Word of mouth was important, and they talked to people in the park during Food Not Bombs on Sundays about the plan. A flier advertising the event was created, titled in “Monroe Park Tent City” (DOC T). It also featured a photo of a man in a business suit with a briefcase walking by the words “Smash Capitalism” spray painted on a wall. The content of the flier, including the image, show the political leanings of the event, and reveal the radicalism behind it. “Why does this concern you? It is quite simple really. It is the age-old theory of not waiting until the problem is upon your door and there is no one left to fight for youཀ V.C.U.’s ongoing development and gentrification has affected thousands of Richmond’s citizens and it is just a matter of time before you are all that is left…” ( DOC T).

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Sad today

22 Nov

I feel sad today. Last night my boo that I live with broke up with me. They basically shoulda done so months ago, but instead just stopped truly communicating with me or sleeping in the same room. I was trying to give them space and not push them because I trusted them and didn’t know what was going on. But what was going on is that they don’t think they are compatible with me. One less vegan straightedge queer anarchist for me to try and date : ( super bummer. So now I am bummed out, and I don’t know what to do.

I don’t really feel very connected to the ‘radical’ scene in RVA these days.  Liberals, drinkers, corpse eaters, and straight people are not my cup of tea. There is honestly just only so much connection I can have with people who’s values are radically different from my own. And there really aren’t very many anarchists here either. It sucks. I get along with anarchists who come through town and that makes me happy, but Richmond anarchist culture and social circles is seriously lacking. I feel pretty friendless and isolated.

Richmond needs more anarchists.

This Is War- From Cuddle Puddles and Hot Pants #5

17 Oct

<!– @page { size: 8.5in 11in; margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>This is an essay from the 5th issue of Cuddle Puddles and Hot Pants. If you want to get the whole zine you can mail me 2 bux to Mo Karnage P.O. Box 6025 Richmond, Va 23222

This is War

 

This is War. We exist in a state of war. I strongly suspect that stating “This Is War” is going to be taken by some as a declaration of war. It is not. This is an observation of war. This is an acknowledgment of war. Anarchists are at war. People of color are at war. The poor are at war. Women are at war. Queers are at war. Animals, the environment, differently abled folks, and the elderly are at war.

This war was declared on us. And I think it might have always been a factor, since the beginning of human history, at least for some of these groups. Capitalism is a major factor in the way that today’s situation is played out- it defines the format of the struggles/war.

Let me break it down some. War is defined as- 1- a state of usually open and declared armed hostile conflict between states or nations or -2- a state of hostility, conflict, or antagonism- a struggle or competition between opposing forces or for a particular end.

Without even stretching the definition of war it is clear that the capitalist/straight/white/rich/male powers that be are at war with the rest of us. The capitalist system, as well as the governing system in the United States of Amerikka, depend on hierarchy to exist. And hierarchy is maintained by keeping certain people down/oppressed.

Memes like the War on Terror and the War on Drugs make this situation even more explicit. The bottom line is that for centuries people have been enslaved, hurt, tortured, harassed, sexually assaulted, imprisoned, massacred, murdered, executed, assassinated, assaulted, and generally speaking really fucking oppressed. Our side is losing and it hurts.

Memes like the War on Terror and the War on Drugs are also important to understand as meaning more than simply fighting drugs and fighting terror. Because there are basically certain groups of people who are more effected by these concepts than others. The War on Drugs is basically a cover for a racist and classist war against people of color and poor people. The War on Terror is racist, colonial and Islamaphobic, as well as clearly an oppressive political tool.

Why does this matter? Might be the question running through your head. I strongly believe that we need to conceptualize this situation as war in order to understand fully the gravity of it, as well as in order to develop appropriate and effective tactics and strategies. Continue reading

Food Not Bombs Statement Regarding Monroe Park

10 Oct

Richmond Food Not Bombs has been sharing food in Monroe Park for over sixteen years now. We have developed many connections and friendships over the course of our existence, helped provide healthy food to many individuals who may not have had access to it otherwise, and become a staple of social activity for many people’s Sunday afternoons.

The proposed renovations to Monroe Park are an attack , a judgement on who the park should and shouldn’t be for. It is an attack on the homeless, the “homeless-appearing” (whatever that means – it’s in the Monroe Park Advisory Council’s renovation plans), and groups and individuals who don’t judge people by their social status or whether they have conventional means of acquiring shelter.

We will not stand for it.

The only change that the park really needs is for the city to do its job when it comes do doing maintenance on the bathrooms, as they are functional but one of the water pipes to the sinks has corroded away. Other improvements, such as installing permanent chess tables, or a playground area for kids would be nice, but NOT at the cost of driving out the folks who currently congregate in the park, shutting the entire park down for 18 months, or privatizing the security of the park. Continue reading

Richmond Transit Riders Union

19 May

This is a new project being initiated by the new Richmond IWW chapter. GRTC and the state of Richmond’s public transportation are both in poor repair. If we want a more socially just community then we need more effective and accessible public transportation options. Please consider helping out RTRU, talking to folks in your area about it, etc. There is not yet a website for this group, but there will be soon.

You can contact RTRU at: richmondtru@gmail.com

Here is more information about what the group hopes to do:

“About 88 percent of the Richmond region’s commuters travel to and from work in a car, typically alone,”

Public transit is necessary for the mobility of the elderly and the disabled. It is necessary for communities without markets to access the things they need. For those without a car, it is the ability to seek necessary medical attention, to keep a job, and to get home at the end of the closing shift. It is necessary because the valorization of car ownership leads to ecological disaster, exacerbates the fight for fossil fuels, batters local budgets by deteriorating roads over and over again, and results in daily misery with the widespread congestion of commuting workers.

However, here in Richmond, VA, year after year, bus fares increase and service is cut. The buses have little to no access to suburban job centers. The poor, working-class, and communities of color are punished daily for not subscribing to the car-ownership money pit. And the drivers and mechanics who are the life-blood of the bus system are underpaid, and mistreated. Continue reading

May 19th: Virginia Death Penalty

19 May

The Death Penalty is just one of the many ways in which the State participates in the murder of people. Virginia has the second highest Death penalty rate in the United States. Virginia has murdered 106 people by the death penalty. Tomorrow is the date scheduled for the next state sanctioned murder. Details on that particular case are below.

Here is a link to the names of people killed through the death penalty in Virginia: http://www.vadp.org/virginia039s-execution-history.html

HELP STOP VIRGINIA’S 107th EXECUTION – May 20, 2010

In September, 1998, Darick Demorris Walker was sentenced to death for the capital murders of Stanley Roger Beale and Clarence Threat. Beale was killed in November, 1996 and Threat in June, 1997.  It is important that the Governor continue to hear from you that you oppose the execution of Darick Walker.  Please take a few minutes to say “NO” to executions and help us stop the cycle of violence that state sanctioned killing perpetuates.

Please take one or more of the following actions:

1. Contact Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell TODAY and ask him to stop the execution

2. Forward this and ask people you know to also contact Governor McDonnell

3. Attend a vigil on May 20th

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