Tag Archives: The Wingnut

Settling in for the winter

29 Nov

I am always excited for sping and summer when they come, but there is also something relaxing about getting all ready to nest for the winter. There seem to be fewer scheduled activities and more time for drinking coffee and tea and playing scrabble and other board games with friends.

We’ve also been doing some renovations and improvements around the Wingnut- including repainting the bathroom, repainting the kitchen, attaching the base board correctly in the bathroom, hanging a potrack in the kitchen, installing 4 doorknobs in the past month, installing a threshhold in the upstairs bathroom, building panel walls for the front porch and painting some baseboard that only had primer on it.

Upcoming projects might include painting a mural on the porch panels, building benches out of pallet wood, building a coat rack, making concrete countertops for the kitchen, moving the sink onto a concrete counter top in a better location, fixing the backyard fence, building bookshelves for our radical lending library, demo-ing a trailer in the backyard etc.

But right now, I just ate some waffles and I’m going to drink some coffee to wash them down. Then the  post office and library!

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August Really Really Free Market

11 Aug

Richmond has had its very own Really Really Free Market for over 2 years now. And simply having been maintained on a monthly basis for over 2 years is quite the accomplishment.

However I think it is important to recognize that there is a lot of room for improvement with the Richmond Really Really Free Market. We have had a very hard time engaging more of the community in the event. It has had little success including things like food, workshops, music, games etc. Many months it ends up just being a place where people come to get free stuff. So it has not been very successful in building a community that helps each other in solidarity outside of the restrictions of a capitalist market.

This month’s event will be on Saturday August 28th. It starts at Noon and will go until 3pm. It happens in Monroe Park at the corner of Main and Laurel, near VCU.

At 2pm there will be an organizational meeting about the RRFM. Anyone is welcome to come. With originally just 1 person organizing it, and now just a small handful, it has been hard to maintain the energy necessary to build the RRFM into a vibrant community event. I hope that more people will want to get involved in terms of organizing for the RRFM.

Organizing it can mean making facebook events, making fliers, sending press releases, emailing your friends, facilitating a workshop, coming up with themes, volunteering to take the leftovers to Diversity Thrift at the end of the day, bringing games or sports to play during the event, getting people to come play music during the event, sharing a skill at the RRFM- giving massages, doing henna, reading tarot,  etc.

I’m excited to see what happens at this meeting!

Guide to Richmond Food Not Bombs

6 Mar

This is a guide to Richmond Food Not Bombs that I have been working on for a while. I want to eventually have print copies that we can give to new folks so they can get a feel for what we do and why (and how). Any edits, criticisms or additions are welcome.

Welcome to Richmond Food Not Bombs!

This zine is meant to give you more information about Food Not Bombs so you can have many of your questions, including the ones you didn’t know you had, answered. If you have any ideas, suggestions, or questions not included in this zine, feel free to bring them up to folks at Food Not Bombs- we are always excited to challenge each other and grow as a community.

Richmond, Virginia Food Not Bombs

Started mainly as a political statement, Food Not Bombs, was born in 1980. The movement’s founding members served free food to the homeless outside of a stockholders’ meeting of the First National Bank in Boston. A bank which “red-lined” many poverty-stricken districts in the city while it simultaneously funded much of New England’s weapons industry. The group’s message was simple: “Less money should be spent on destructive military equipment while much of our nation’s population lives in poverty”. This first Food Not Bombs action made a strong political statement, while at the same time providing a simple and practical service to those in need. Now, 30 years later, groups all over the world operate with the same simple humanitarian cause using the name Food Not Bombs.

Food Not Bombs has been a Richmond organization since 1994. For over 16 years the Richmond group has served a weekly meal, only missing 2 servings in its history. The group was founded by activists, and while the membership has changed, there are still connections between the original members and todays activists. Not only that, but the spirit of the group remains the same.

What Does Food Not Bombs Do?

Like any major city in our country, Richmond has a growing number of citizens without homes or the means to acquire healthy food. Food Not Bombs Richmond serves a free, hot, vegan meal in Monroe Park, near the intersection of Main and Belvidere Streets. Close to 200 people eat dinner with us every Sunday, including families. Rice, vegetable stir fry, salad, fruit, bread, and drinks are typically prepared. After the meal, free groceries are made available. We also distribute baked goods and produce to other community organizations. Demonstrations and community events such as Really Really Free Markets, REPHRAME Meetings, the May Day Parade and more are other opportunities for Food Not Bombs to provide a meal while increasing our visibility and developing solidarity with local activists. Continue reading

Memorializing People Murdered By The State

15 Feb

If you check out the blog about the collective I live in, The Wingnut, (www.thewingnutrva.wordpress.com), you will see that we are having a Memorial Day cookout during which we intend to memorialize people killed by the state. So folks killed by police, CIA, FBI etc.

Examples include Fred Hampton, Oscar Grant etc.

We could use help compiling a good list. Continue reading

Tricycle Gardens- Uh Oh

14 Feb

Last week I talked to Lisa Taranto on the phone, and was really dismayed at what I found out about Tricycle gardens and their assessment of economic issues. So I posted a comment on Christopher MAxwell’s profile when he was talking about a Tricycle Gardens. Woke up this morning to a personal attack in my email from Lisa Taranto of Tricycle Gardens.

I had originally said ” I am not sure how I feel about Tricycle Gardens. Lisa told me that “food should not be charity”and because tricycle believes that we should have a world of equal job opportunity they wont do a free workshop. Sorta started to sound less like community gardens and More like just another self serving non profit.” Continue reading