Tag Archives: Virginia

Wingnut Food Distribution Program!

11 Aug

This Saturday is the second monthly event coordinated between the Wingnut Anarchist Collective and the Virginia Food Bank. The Wingnuts have been handing out food vouchers throughout the neighborhood over the past month.

So Saturday the 14th at 12noon the Wingnuts will begin setting up the food with the food bank at the parking lot at the corner of Graham and North Avenue in Southern Barton Heights. Then at 1 the distribution will begin. Folks with vouchers will get priority, just because that is the only method we have to keep it organized. The Food Bank only brings but so much food a month, but will hopefully continue to bring more each month.

This month the Wingnuts will also be tabling with fliers about the numerous events and programs they are involved with, as well as know your rights literature. Continue reading

Thanks to all Anti-Racists

10 Aug

To preface this, I am white- just to let you know if you don’t know me.

And where I was born and raised (Hanover and Richmond Virginia) the issue of racism is not dealt with particularly well. When I went to college in Massachusetts I found myself very out of my element. I did not want to be a racist, but back in Virginia had never encountered anyone challenging me on issues of race, privilege, appropriation, prejudice etc.

I had a hard time learning to deal with being called out on my behavior. I had a hard time coming to understand the difference between racism and prejudice. I was very difficult and I’m sure seriously upset and traumatized and angered people who were fighting racism and privilege. I’m sorry for any tears, sleepless nights etc. that my insensitivity contributed to.  I’m sorry it takes me being in your shoes to be able to even begin to understand the shit you have to deal with.

Now that I am going through the ordeal that is trying to explain to people what racism and prejudice are and are not etc., I have a serious appreciation for how much upset and strife I no doubt caused everyone who called me out in the past. I wish there was a better way to let everyone know how sorry I am for being so ignorant/resistant/defensive.

I am trying to not be so ignorant/resistant/defensive. I think working on privilege and race are life long tasks, so I am sure I am going to be making more mistakes.  I want to try not to, but I also want to try to be open to criticism and to avoid getting defensive. Please do call me out, preferably in a non-attack manner.  Genuine attempts to call me out will be met with a ready listener.

Richmond Transit Riders Union

19 May

This is a new project being initiated by the new Richmond IWW chapter. GRTC and the state of Richmond’s public transportation are both in poor repair. If we want a more socially just community then we need more effective and accessible public transportation options. Please consider helping out RTRU, talking to folks in your area about it, etc. There is not yet a website for this group, but there will be soon.

You can contact RTRU at: richmondtru@gmail.com

Here is more information about what the group hopes to do:

“About 88 percent of the Richmond region’s commuters travel to and from work in a car, typically alone,”

Public transit is necessary for the mobility of the elderly and the disabled. It is necessary for communities without markets to access the things they need. For those without a car, it is the ability to seek necessary medical attention, to keep a job, and to get home at the end of the closing shift. It is necessary because the valorization of car ownership leads to ecological disaster, exacerbates the fight for fossil fuels, batters local budgets by deteriorating roads over and over again, and results in daily misery with the widespread congestion of commuting workers.

However, here in Richmond, VA, year after year, bus fares increase and service is cut. The buses have little to no access to suburban job centers. The poor, working-class, and communities of color are punished daily for not subscribing to the car-ownership money pit. And the drivers and mechanics who are the life-blood of the bus system are underpaid, and mistreated. Continue reading

May 19th: Virginia Death Penalty

19 May

The Death Penalty is just one of the many ways in which the State participates in the murder of people. Virginia has the second highest Death penalty rate in the United States. Virginia has murdered 106 people by the death penalty. Tomorrow is the date scheduled for the next state sanctioned murder. Details on that particular case are below.

Here is a link to the names of people killed through the death penalty in Virginia: http://www.vadp.org/virginia039s-execution-history.html

HELP STOP VIRGINIA’S 107th EXECUTION – May 20, 2010

In September, 1998, Darick Demorris Walker was sentenced to death for the capital murders of Stanley Roger Beale and Clarence Threat. Beale was killed in November, 1996 and Threat in June, 1997.  It is important that the Governor continue to hear from you that you oppose the execution of Darick Walker.  Please take a few minutes to say “NO” to executions and help us stop the cycle of violence that state sanctioned killing perpetuates.

Please take one or more of the following actions:

1. Contact Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell TODAY and ask him to stop the execution

2. Forward this and ask people you know to also contact Governor McDonnell

3. Attend a vigil on May 20th

Continue reading

May 9th: Nat Turner

10 May

Nat Turner led a slave rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia on August 21, 1831 that resulted in 56 deaths of white people. Turner was smart and also very religious. He believed he was destined to do something, and that signs pointed towards a rebellion against slavery.

Turner started with a few fellow slaves, and then went from house to house freeing slaves and killing white people. Eventually around 70 slaves and freed blacks were involved. They actually avoided attacking some homes of poor white people, thinking they had more in common with the blacks.

Continue reading

May 8th: Gabriel

10 May

Gabriel was an enslaved blacksmith in the Richmond, Virginia area who was planning a slave revolt in 1800. Someone snitched, and as a result Gabriel and 26 others were murdered- hung at the Negro Burial Ground in Richmond- the place that is currently covered by 1-95 and a VCU parking lot.

While Gabriel and the others were not able to actually begin the revolt, the threat of a revolt was enough to scare many white people in Virginia. Continue reading

Mayor’s response to May Day Petition

29 Apr

After signing the petition I got a form response back from someone in the Mayor’s office:

Mayor Jones is in receipt of your concern regarding the Richmond May Day Parade.  The Mayor has asked that I respond regarding your concerns.  The Richmond Police Department advises that a permit has been issued allowing the parade to proceed on sidewalks, grass, and other public property (absent in the roadways) at no cost.

For safety reasons, a parade which requires that streets be closed also requires that officers be deployed.  Our policy requires that the cost of officers (two are needed for this event) must be borne by the parade organizers. The organizers of the event have indicated they do not want to pay for the officers; therefore we are unable to close the streets. We must be concerned first and foremost for the safety of everyone.

Thank you.

Cheryl Ivey Green

Assistant to the Mayor

City of Richmond

900 E. Broad Street

Richmond, VA  23219

Mayor’s Office

804-646-7970

cheryl.green@richmondgov.com

Building a Better Richmond

So I replied back- to inform her of some of the other relevant details in this issue:

Would you please inform Mayor Jones that there is not mention in the relevant city ordinance that parades in the street require purchase of officers. And also that there have been multiple assemblies in the streets in Richmond in the past years, including the Virginia People’s Assembly this January which had permits for a street march but were NOT required or even asked to pay for police presence.

I strongly believe that the decision on the part of the Richmond Police to ask for money in this instance is a deliberate one meant to silence the free speech of the worker’s movement in Richmond.

Mo Karn