Tag Archives: black liberation

May 14th: MOVE 11

14 May

The MOVE Organization was a black liberation group whose members adopted the last name AFrica, and promoted a back-to nature lifestyle. They were based in Philadelphia. They were something of a primitivist group, who promoted the hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

There were 2 instances where the Philadelphia Police confronted them- once in 1978 and once in 1985. In 1978 police came to evict the MOVE members from their communal house. During the incident, there was a shootout. One pig was killed. 7 other pigs, 5 firefighters, 3 MOVE members, and 3 bystanders were injured.

9 MOVE members were found guilty of 3rd degree murder. THEY ARE STILL IN PRISON. 7 of the 9 became eligible for parole in 2008, but have been denied. They come up for parole every year.

On May 13, 1985 the Philadelphia Police Department again tried to evict the MOVE organization from their new house, based on neighbor complaints over things like Bullhorn announcements and compost piles. When the MOVE members refused to leave the police attacked the house with tear gas, and the fire department sprayed it with water cannons. After that a burst of gunfire came from the house, which resulted in 90 minutes of return fire from the police- thousands of rounds were shot at the house. Then, the  Philadelphia Police dropped a BOMB on MOVE headquarters. The bomb set the house, and eventually an entire city block on fire.

John Africa, 5 other adults, and 5 CHILDREN died in the fire. There were only 2 surviving children.

The city was found to have overreacted, and money was paid out to a survivor and relative of someone who died. However, there does not appear to have been any culpability given to individual police involved- none of them have served jail time for the 11 murders.

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May 7th: George Jackson

10 May

George Jackson was serving a prison sentence when he became politically active. He first studied socialism, and then joined the Black Panthers. He wrote 2 books, Blood in My Eye and Soledad Brother,  while in prison which gained him international attention.

In January of 1970 he was convicted of killing a prison guard within the Soledad prison, in retaliation for the shooting death of 3 black inmates. He and 2 others were moved to solitary confinement, and became known as the Soledad brothers. Continue reading

May 3rd- Fred Hampton

3 May

Fred Hampton was a Black Panther who was assassinated by the government on December 4th 1969. He was a member of the Illinois branch of the Black Panther Party. He was shot to death while he lay in bed. His murder is one of the more blatant political assassinations in the USA. He was killed by Cook County, Chicago, and FBI officers.

He was targeted because he and the Black Panther Party represented a serious threat to the status quo of capitalist Amerikkka. He was targeted specifically because he was a good organizer and motivator, and thus a very useful member of the BLack Panther Party.

The brutality of the FBI and government is a point to be emphasized in this case. An FBI informant drugged the members of the household at dinner with a barbituate. They were all drugged and asleep when the house was raided. The Panthers did not even have the oppourtunity to react in self defense . And yet, deadly force was still used to murder Hampton. The police statements after the fact characterized the panthers as violent. The police and the government blatantly have lied about the entire situation, which should make it clear to all revolutionaries that they are never to be trusted. They will make up lies to cover their butts after they act outside of the law.

The documentary on this case, called The Murder of Fred Hampton is being screened tonight at 8 at the Wingnut. We will hold future screenings if people are interested in seeing the film.

Movie Screening: The Angola 3- Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation

19 Jan

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Movie Screening: The Angola 3- Black Panthers and the Last Slave Plantation

Celebrate Black History Month with the Richmond Anarchist Black Cross
Come join the Richmond Anarchist Black Cross as they create community dialogue around prison issues through movie screenings. The movies being shown in this series are not widely available so this is a great opportunity to see some films that aren’t easy to get a hold of. These bimonthly screenings are happening at the William Byrd Community Center, on Thursdays at 7. In February the 2 films being shown feature specifically prisoners that are people of color and deal with black liberation issues in celebration of Black history month. Continue reading